Common Objects

Memory Machine, built for listening. Buried deep inside digital services at SMU (not pictured: day- glo yellow and pink memorex cassetes, 90 min. each, with irreplaceable interviews and analog hiss) View Larger

Memory Machine, built for listening. Buried deep inside digital services at SMU (not pictured: day- glo yellow and pink memorex cassetes, 90 min. each, with irreplaceable interviews and analog hiss)


nprfreshair:

Before pursuing stand-up comedy full-time, Hari Kondabolu was a human rights activist. At first telling jokes was a cathartic release from the intense work he did with victims of hate crimes and workplace discrimination. In today’s interview he recounts how he began to incorporate aspects of his work into his comedy: 

"I used to do a bit where I used to read the U.S. citizenship application onstage. I think that’s part of just being overeducated and wanting to do document analysis, but I’d actually bring it on stage and read questions. Because for people who don’t know, this is what immigrants have to go through to gain status in this country and it’s absurd and it’s something we take for granted as American citizens.
Sometimes that was hard in a club on a Friday night and it’s 10 o-clock and everyone’s drunk and there’s a dude on stage reading a form, it’s a strange thing to read a government form in front of a bunch of drunk people.”


Hari’s new comedy album is called Waiting for 2042. 
Photo by Kyle Johnson

Humor and horror. View Larger

nprfreshair:

Before pursuing stand-up comedy full-time, Hari Kondabolu was a human rights activist. At first telling jokes was a cathartic release from the intense work he did with victims of hate crimes and workplace discrimination. In today’s interview he recounts how he began to incorporate aspects of his work into his comedy: 

"I used to do a bit where I used to read the U.S. citizenship application onstage. I think that’s part of just being overeducated and wanting to do document analysis, but I’d actually bring it on stage and read questions. Because for people who don’t know, this is what immigrants have to go through to gain status in this country and it’s absurd and it’s something we take for granted as American citizens.

Sometimes that was hard in a club on a Friday night and it’s 10 o-clock and everyone’s drunk and there’s a dude on stage reading a form, it’s a strange thing to read a government form in front of a bunch of drunk people.”

Hari’s new comedy album is called Waiting for 2042

Photo by Kyle Johnson

Humor and horror.


Shelly Rambo on Trauma: Holy Saturday

On this Holy Saturday I have actually had the day off, so it seemed like two days. We planted a garden, cleaned the porch. I have had a conversation with Shelly Rambo from last year on my mind and I am reposting it tonight for anyone who is coming down off the vigil, or who does not care about the vigil, or who does not know what the vigil is, or just couldn’t get to one. She discussed these topics in the context of theological reflection on the mass shooting at Sandy Hook. 

Shelly L. Rambo on Presence, Trauma, and Resurrection—Part One

"I worry, as well, that proclamations of God’s presence in the suffering can run the risk of justifying the suffering or seeing it as God’s means of strengthening or testing faith…O’Neill moves us away from explanation and proclamation, and instead turns us to the enactments of God’s presence in the suffering. We are the light in the darkness. I would go even further to think about particular practices of presencing and think about incarnation in close connection to resurrection. What does it mean to rise from the dead? How do we witness life emerging from wounded flesh?”

Shelly L. Rambo on Presence, Trauma, and Resurrection—Part Two

"Just as I had been shaped by [my mother’s] scars, what, of Thomas’ becoming, would be shaped by these scars? My mother’s scars became sacred to me by way of the biblical story, and it tied her to a lineage of Christian saints, like Macrina, whose flesh marked a life’s journey. This is very tricky territory to navigate, since I resist glorifying suffering. But it seems right to acknowledge that the very tangible marks of one’s person can shape, empower, and guide others. I would like to think that resurrection connects us to those who have come before us not in some ethereal way but in tangible traces of life that reappear and continue to shape us."


Dallas is a profoundly segregated city. The few blocks closest to where we live are mostly white, though on the border with mostly Latino/a census tracts. In those elaborate dot maps of the 2010 census data, there are more multi-colored dots around our street than, say, Highland Park. 
Anyway, I took all these pictures on one street near our house. Each of these houses is essentially adjacent to one another. The diversity on hand is representative of quite different worlds functioning with overlapping itineraries that only intersect if you walk the dog or have kids the same age.
The people living in the great old apartment buildings with no central air, all one-beds and efficiencies, do not usually work in the same sorts of places as the people in the slick, spacious modern condo units. The titanic, two-story houses with stone or brick facades and garages like great mouths have families inside who do not go to the same parties as the people in the pink cottages, slot houses, chain link fences.
We lived next to a couple in a house like the beige one for nearly five years, new, clean, chunks of sod watered constantly in the front yard. I spoke to them twice. They had a child; a tree died in their front yard. They went in through the back door, concealed by a thick privacy fence. When they had a baby shower I was astonished that they knew people. But it should have been obvious. Even here you can see that at least four completely different cities live all on the same block. Dallas is a profoundly segregated city. The few blocks closest to where we live are mostly white, though on the border with mostly Latino/a census tracts. In those elaborate dot maps of the 2010 census data, there are more multi-colored dots around our street than, say, Highland Park. 
Anyway, I took all these pictures on one street near our house. Each of these houses is essentially adjacent to one another. The diversity on hand is representative of quite different worlds functioning with overlapping itineraries that only intersect if you walk the dog or have kids the same age.
The people living in the great old apartment buildings with no central air, all one-beds and efficiencies, do not usually work in the same sorts of places as the people in the slick, spacious modern condo units. The titanic, two-story houses with stone or brick facades and garages like great mouths have families inside who do not go to the same parties as the people in the pink cottages, slot houses, chain link fences.
We lived next to a couple in a house like the beige one for nearly five years, new, clean, chunks of sod watered constantly in the front yard. I spoke to them twice. They had a child; a tree died in their front yard. They went in through the back door, concealed by a thick privacy fence. When they had a baby shower I was astonished that they knew people. But it should have been obvious. Even here you can see that at least four completely different cities live all on the same block. Dallas is a profoundly segregated city. The few blocks closest to where we live are mostly white, though on the border with mostly Latino/a census tracts. In those elaborate dot maps of the 2010 census data, there are more multi-colored dots around our street than, say, Highland Park. 
Anyway, I took all these pictures on one street near our house. Each of these houses is essentially adjacent to one another. The diversity on hand is representative of quite different worlds functioning with overlapping itineraries that only intersect if you walk the dog or have kids the same age.
The people living in the great old apartment buildings with no central air, all one-beds and efficiencies, do not usually work in the same sorts of places as the people in the slick, spacious modern condo units. The titanic, two-story houses with stone or brick facades and garages like great mouths have families inside who do not go to the same parties as the people in the pink cottages, slot houses, chain link fences.
We lived next to a couple in a house like the beige one for nearly five years, new, clean, chunks of sod watered constantly in the front yard. I spoke to them twice. They had a child; a tree died in their front yard. They went in through the back door, concealed by a thick privacy fence. When they had a baby shower I was astonished that they knew people. But it should have been obvious. Even here you can see that at least four completely different cities live all on the same block. Dallas is a profoundly segregated city. The few blocks closest to where we live are mostly white, though on the border with mostly Latino/a census tracts. In those elaborate dot maps of the 2010 census data, there are more multi-colored dots around our street than, say, Highland Park. 
Anyway, I took all these pictures on one street near our house. Each of these houses is essentially adjacent to one another. The diversity on hand is representative of quite different worlds functioning with overlapping itineraries that only intersect if you walk the dog or have kids the same age.
The people living in the great old apartment buildings with no central air, all one-beds and efficiencies, do not usually work in the same sorts of places as the people in the slick, spacious modern condo units. The titanic, two-story houses with stone or brick facades and garages like great mouths have families inside who do not go to the same parties as the people in the pink cottages, slot houses, chain link fences.
We lived next to a couple in a house like the beige one for nearly five years, new, clean, chunks of sod watered constantly in the front yard. I spoke to them twice. They had a child; a tree died in their front yard. They went in through the back door, concealed by a thick privacy fence. When they had a baby shower I was astonished that they knew people. But it should have been obvious. Even here you can see that at least four completely different cities live all on the same block. 

Dallas is a profoundly segregated city. The few blocks closest to where we live are mostly white, though on the border with mostly Latino/a census tracts. In those elaborate dot maps of the 2010 census data, there are more multi-colored dots around our street than, say, Highland Park. 

Anyway, I took all these pictures on one street near our house. Each of these houses is essentially adjacent to one another. The diversity on hand is representative of quite different worlds functioning with overlapping itineraries that only intersect if you walk the dog or have kids the same age.

The people living in the great old apartment buildings with no central air, all one-beds and efficiencies, do not usually work in the same sorts of places as the people in the slick, spacious modern condo units. The titanic, two-story houses with stone or brick facades and garages like great mouths have families inside who do not go to the same parties as the people in the pink cottages, slot houses, chain link fences.

We lived next to a couple in a house like the beige one for nearly five years, new, clean, chunks of sod watered constantly in the front yard. I spoke to them twice. They had a child; a tree died in their front yard. They went in through the back door, concealed by a thick privacy fence. When they had a baby shower I was astonished that they knew people. But it should have been obvious. Even here you can see that at least four completely different cities live all on the same block. 


uispeccoll:

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record

Welcome to the addictive and fun world of GIF animation.
uispeccoll:

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record

Welcome to the addictive and fun world of GIF animation.
uispeccoll:

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record

Welcome to the addictive and fun world of GIF animation.

uispeccoll:

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 

These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 

Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 

Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 

MERLIN catalog record

Welcome to the addictive and fun world of GIF animation.


nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.
NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.
When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.
For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.
"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.
Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard
nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.
NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.
When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.
For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.
"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.
Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard
nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.
NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.
When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.
For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.
"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.
Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard
nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.
NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.
When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.
For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.
"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.
Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard

nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.

NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.

When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.

For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.

"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.

Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard